Bard PowerPort Leads, Marketing and Intake: A Guide for Legal Call Center Agents

Bard PowerPort

Table of Contents

Introduction: Understanding Bard PowerPort Leads and Injuries

Here at Advocate Rights Center, our mass tort intake call center has been engaged in generating Bard PowerPort leads, marketing, and intake for product liability law firms.

In this article, we will share our experience with qualifying prospective claimants who have been injured by these devices. 

In the world of legal intake for potential product liability cases involving defective port-a-caths or chemo ports, it is crucial for mass tort intake call center agents to be well-versed in the criteria related to Bard PowerPort injuries. [1]

What Is A Bard PowerPort Lead?

Bard PowerPort lead

A Bard PowerPort lead is a person who has submitted his or her information from an advertisement claiming to have been injured by a TIVAD, which is a totally implantable venous access device (TIVAD). When compromised, these devices can lead to severe health complications, especially infections, sepsis, and blood clots. [2]  

These devices are also commonly referred to as a port-a-cath. This article aims to educate mass tort intake call center agents, who may not have a formal medical background, on the criteria for qualifying potential patients. This information may also provide valuable  insights into the types of ailments associated with Bard PowerPort injuries.

Bard PowerPort Leads: Criteria

  1. TIVAD Implantation: To qualify, the individual must have had a TIVAD implanted.
    • Exclusion: If the TIVAD was implanted solely for dialysis, the individual is disqualified.
    • Exclusion: If the implantation occurred before 2008, the client may be required to obtain their own records.
  2. Qualifying Events: Depending upon law firm criteria, which typically is based upon recommendations from Plaintiff Leadership members, the potential patient must meet one of the following criteria:
    1. The individual was informed that the TIVAD had fractured, cracked, migrated, or rotated; and/or:
    2. The individual experienced one or more of the following events while the TIVAD was still implanted:
      • Bloodstream infection/sepsis (only within 30 days post-implant)
      • Perforations of tissues, vessels, and organs
      • Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) or Blood Clots
      • Catheter embolization
      • Pulmonary embolism
      • Hematoma
      • Hemorrhaging or Bleeding
      • Necrosis (dead tissue) around the port site
      • Device-related organ damage
      • Cardiac/Pericardial tamponade
      • Cardiac arrhythmia
      • Infections (only within 60 days post-implant)
      • Obstruction of blood flow
  3. Medical Intervention Requirement: Injuries must have necessitated medical intervention to qualify. Exclusion: Disqualified if the potential patient did not seek treatment for the injuries.

Generating Bard PowerPort Leads and Recognizing Potential Cases

  • Generating Bard PowerPort Leads online:

    Mass tort marketing is different for every tort. And, generating Bard PowerPort leads is different because it is not as easy to convey the problems with the medical device. For starters, it is a device inside the body. We’ve seen that many people are not completely familiar with the look of the device. And, when comparing other images online, you’ll see there are medical illustrations, pictures of the device, pictures of people with gauze covering the device. Ultimately, it took three weeks of testing to figure out which image ads and text ads generate cost-effective results so we could scale our Bard PowerPort leads campaign, which is longer than usual. Plus, we tested other online platforms over the course of two weeks to fine-tune our results.

  • Identification of Individuals with Bard PowerPort-Related Complications:

    Mass tort intake call center agents should be attentive to reports of complications such as infections, malfunctions, or adverse reactions related to the Bard PowerPort. Patients experiencing persistent pain, swelling, or signs of systemic issues may warrant further investigation into injuries that are a domino effect of infections, sepsis, and blood clots.

  • Removal or Plan for Removal of Port Catheters:

    This is becoming an important aspect of these claims. However, we are finding that many doctors are not removing the port until the patient’s treatment has been complete. The reason is the benefits of the port, which is to administer treatment, trumps the injuries caused by the port. And example is a patient we spoke with who developed blood clots was prescribed intravenous and oral blood thinners while the clots persisted, and the plan was to explant the device after treatment of the cancer was completed. We are also coming across incidents where the doctor is unaware of the complications associated with these devices. Notably, the amended master complaint for In Re: Bard Implanted Port Catheter Products Liability Litigation mentioned that multiple hospitals, such as Massachusetts General Hospital, has policies prohibiting the use of these devices.

  • Gathering Pertinent Information During Initial Calls:

    Agents should collect essential information, including the nature of the complication, medical diagnoses, and any subsequent treatments received. Detailed accounts of symptoms, date of implantation, date of explanation, and medical histories related to the purpose of the port contribute to a comprehensive assessment of potential Bard PowerPort injury cases. Based upon first-hand and second-hand experience, implantation of these devices likely is due to chemotherapy after a cancer diagnosis. 

Understanding Why Bard PowerPort Leads and Patients Are Getting Injured

Bard PowerPort

Generating Bard PowerPort leads requires an understanding of the injuries. Converting Bard PowerPort leads requires understanding how people get inured and what the company was aware of regarding these injuries.  

According to the amended master complaint, “when the barium sulfate degrades in vivo, it causes cracks, fissures, divots, and/or pitting on the surface of the catheter” that harbor microbes and can cause infections. 

Our mass tort intake specialists are showing infection, sepsis, and blood clots as the top injuries, in that order.

Another important problem with these port catheters is the reduction of mechanical integrity that degrades as the barium sulfate corrodes. This issue causes cracks, fissures, divots, and/or pitting on the surface of the catheter. [8] The subsequent affect is catheter fracture and, in some cases, “complete mechanical fracture.” [9]

complete mechanical fracture

Additionally, cracks on the catheter allows fibrinous material collects on the surface of the devices, which causes thrombosis.

Understanding Ailments Associated with Bard PowerPort Leads and Injuries

Now, let’s explore the types of ailments that may be associated with Bard PowerPort leads and injuries patients incur. This information will help mass tort intake call center agents comprehend the medical context and better assess potential patients.

1. Infections (within 30 days post-implant):

Infections have been the primary injury related to people who submit Bard PowerPort leads. Infections occurring within 30 days post-implantation of a Totally Implantable Venous Access Device (TIVAD) pose a significant risk, as they can spread rapidly and lead to systemic complications if not addressed promptly.

The proximity of the TIVAD to the bloodstream makes it susceptible to bacterial colonization, which can result in localized infections around the implant site once the device harbors microbes and bacteria. If left untreated, these infections can progress, leading to systemic complications such as bloodstream infections (sepsis) that can have serious consequences for the individual’s health. [7]

Symptoms of TIVAD-related infections may include redness, swelling, warmth, or pain at the implant site, as well as fever and chills. Early recognition of these signs is crucial to initiate timely medical intervention. [7]

Treatment typically involves antibiotic therapy targeted at the specific bacteria causing the infection. In some cases, surgical removal of the infected TIVAD may be necessary. In fact, we have found that removal is a specific trigger that mass tort intake agents should flag. Timely and appropriate management of treatment not only addresses the localized infection but also helps prevent the spread of bacteria into the bloodstream, reducing the risk of systemic complications. [7]

Healthcare professionals closely monitor individuals with TIVADs for signs of infection, emphasizing the importance of vigilant care, proper hygiene, and immediate medical attention if symptoms arise within the critical 30-day post-implantation period. [7]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Infections related to people submitting Bard PowerPort leads can affect individuals of various ages, but they are more common in adults who require long-term intravenous access for conditions such as cancer treatment or long-term antibiotic therapy.

Individuals with compromised immune systems, such as those undergoing chemotherapy, immunosuppressive therapy, or with underlying medical conditions affecting immune function, may be at higher risk of developing infections related to Bard PowerPort.

Patients who have recently undergone procedures involving the insertion, maintenance, or removal of Bard PowerPort devices are at increased risk of infection. This includes patients undergoing cancer treatment (which we’ve witnessed as the primary injury), long-term intravenous therapy, or those with chronic medical conditions requiring frequent venous access.

There is no specific gender predisposition for infections related to Bard PowerPort. Both males and females can be affected. However, we are noticing that the 40+ age group generates most claimants.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Prompt diagnosis of infections related to people submitting Bard PowerPort leads is essential to prevent complications such as bloodstream infections, sepsis, and the spread of infection to surrounding tissues or organs.

  • Clinical Assessment: Signs and symptoms of infection around the Bard PowerPort site may include redness, swelling, warmth, tenderness, drainage, fever, chills, and systemic signs of infection such as elevated white blood cell count.
  • Imaging Studies: Ultrasonography or other imaging modalities may be used to assess the presence of fluid collections, abscess formation, or other abnormalities around the port site.
  • Blood Cultures: Blood cultures may be obtained to identify the causative microorganism if there is suspicion of systemic infection or bacteremia.
  • Port Site Cultures: Cultures of the drainage or tissue samples from the port site may be collected to identify the specific pathogen causing the infection and guide antibiotic therapy.
  • Port Removal: In severe cases of infection, removal of the infected Bard PowerPort device may be necessary to control the infection and prevent further complications. The removed device can be sent for culture analysis to identify the infecting organism.
  • Antibiotic Sensitivity Testing: Testing of cultured isolates for antibiotic sensitivity can help guide appropriate antibiotic therapy based on the susceptibility profile of the identified pathogen.

2. Bloodstream Infection/Sepsis (within 60 days post-implant):

Along with infection, our mass tort intake call center has shown that people submitting Bard PowerPort leads often have sepsis. Moreover, we’ve noted the standard 4+ day overnight hospitalization stemming from this injury. Since sepsis can lead to septic shock, which can be deadly, hospitalization is something intake agents look for when making comments about this health complication. 

A bloodstream infection or sepsis occurring within 30 days post-implantation of a Totally Implantable Venous Access Device (TIVAD) presents a serious and urgent medical concern. 

The implantation of a TIVAD provides direct access to the bloodstream, making it susceptible to bacterial colonization and the potential development of systemic infections. Symptoms of a bloodstream infection or sepsis may include fever, chills, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and general malaise. In the context of a TIVAD, these symptoms often indicate the presence of bacteria in the bloodstream, potentially originating from the device site. [7]

Immediate medical intervention is paramount in such cases. Treatment typically involves administering broad-spectrum antibiotics to target the causative pathogens. In severe instances, removal of the infected TIVAD may be necessary to halt the spread of infection. [7]

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition characterized by a dysregulated immune response to infection, leading to widespread inflammation and organ dysfunction. Timely recognition and treatment are critical to improving outcomes and preventing severe complications associated with sepsis, such as organ failure or septic shock. [7]

Healthcare professionals closely monitor individuals with TIVADs for signs of infection, stressing the importance of meticulous care, proper hygiene, and seeking immediate medical attention if symptoms manifest within the critical 30-day post-implantation window. [7]

Early intervention significantly enhances the chances of successful treatment and mitigates the risk of life-threatening complications. [7]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Often, Bard PowerPort leads to bloodstream infections or sepsis following implantation of Bard PowerPort, and can occur in individuals of various ages. However, they are more prevalent in adults who require long-term intravenous access for conditions such as cancer treatment or long-term antibiotic therapy. The risk may be higher in older adults due to age-related changes in immune function and comorbidities.

Bard PowerPort leads with compromised immune systems, such as those undergoing chemotherapy, immunosuppressive therapy, or with underlying medical conditions affecting immune function, may be at higher risk of developing bloodstream infections or sepsis following Bard PowerPort implantation.

Patients who have recently undergone procedures involving the insertion, maintenance, or removal of Bard PowerPort devices are at increased risk of bloodstream infections or sepsis. This includes patients undergoing cancer treatment, long-term intravenous therapy, or those with chronic medical conditions requiring frequent venous access.

There is no specific gender predisposition for bloodstream infections or sepsis related to Bard PowerPort. Both males and females can be affected.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Early diagnosis of Bard PowerPort-related bloodstream infections or sepsis is essential for preventing complications such as septic shock, organ failure, and death. 

  • Clinical Assessment: Signs and symptoms of bloodstream infection or sepsis may include fever, chills, hypotension, tachycardia, altered mental status, and signs of local infection at the Bard PowerPort site (e.g., erythema, warmth, tenderness, purulent discharge).
  • Blood Cultures: Blood cultures are essential for confirming the diagnosis of bloodstream infection and identifying the causative microorganism. Multiple sets of blood cultures are typically obtained to increase the sensitivity of detection.
  • Imaging Studies: Imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan may be performed to assess for signs of infection or complications around the Bard PowerPort site, such as abscess formation or thrombosis.
  • Port Removal: In cases of suspected or confirmed Bard PowerPort-related bloodstream infection or sepsis, prompt removal of the infected device may be necessary to control the infection and prevent further complications. The removed device can be sent for culture analysis to identify the infecting organism.
  • Antibiotic Sensitivity Testing: Testing of cultured isolates for antibiotic sensitivity can help guide appropriate antibiotic therapy based on the susceptibility profile of the identified pathogen.
  • Laboratory Tests: Laboratory investigations may include complete blood count (CBC), inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein, procalcitonin), and coagulation studies to assess for signs of systemic inflammation and organ dysfunction associated with sepsis.mass

3. Perforations of Tissue, Vessels, and Organs:

Perforations of tissues, vessels, and organs due to a malfunctioning Bard PowerPort leads to  significant health risks. 

This may occur when the structural integrity is compromised due to the release of barium sulfate from the device. Hence, the TIVAD may migrate from the intended area causing punctures or tears of surrounding tissues, vessels, and organs. Further, this can result in severe complications, such as internal bleeding and damage to vital organs. The inadvertent breach of tissues or vessels can lead to a cascade of adverse events, jeopardizing the patient’s well-being. [3]

Internal bleeding may go unnoticed initially, causing a delay in medical intervention and exacerbating the severity of the situation. Damage to vital organs adds layer of complexity, potentially impacting organ function and overall health. [3]

Immediate medical attention is crucial in addressing perforations, as it helps mitigate the risk of further complications and ensures timely intervention to safeguard the patient’s health and well-being. [3]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Perforations of tissues, vessels, and organs can occur across various demographics but may be more prevalent in certain populations due to factors such as age, lifestyle, and underlying health conditions. 

While perforations can affect Bard PowerPort leads of any age, they may be more common in older adults due to age-related changes in tissue integrity and increased likelihood of comorbidities. 

There isn’t a specific gender or racial predilection for this condition; however, certain lifestyle factors or occupational hazards may predispose certain groups to an increased risk.

Surgeries involving invasive instrumentation, such as gastrointestinal surgeries, are often associated with a higher risk of perforation. Additionally, underlying conditions like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diverticulitis, or gastrointestinal cancers can increase the likelihood of tissue perforation. 

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing perforations of tissues, vessels, and organs typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, medical history review, and diagnostic tests. These may include:

  • Physical Examination: A thorough physical examination by a healthcare professional may reveal signs and symptoms suggestive of tissue perforation, such as severe pain, tenderness, swelling, and signs of internal bleeding (e.g., bruising, hypotension).
  • Imaging Studies: Imaging tests such as X-rays, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scans, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be employed to visualize the affected area and identify the presence and extent of perforation. These imaging modalities can help locate the site of perforation and assess the severity of associated complications, such as hemorrhage or organ damage.
  • Endoscopic Procedures: In cases where perforations involve the gastrointestinal tract or other internal organs accessible through endoscopy, such as the bladder or uterus, diagnostic endoscopic procedures may be performed. Endoscopy allows direct visualization of the internal structures and enables clinicians to identify perforations, assess tissue damage, and obtain biopsy samples if necessary.
  • Laboratory Tests: Laboratory investigations, including complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistry tests, and coagulation studies, may be conducted to evaluate for signs of infection, inflammation, or abnormalities in blood clotting that may accompany tissue perforation.
  • Diagnostic Peritoneal Lavage (DPL) or Paracentesis: In cases of suspected abdominal or pelvic organ perforation with associated intra-abdominal bleeding or fluid accumulation, diagnostic procedures such as diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) or paracentesis may be performed to obtain fluid samples for analysis and aid in diagnosis.
  • Clinical History and Surgical Exploration: A detailed clinical history, including information on preceding events or trauma, surgical interventions, and relevant medical conditions, is crucial in guiding the diagnostic approach. In some cases, exploratory surgery may be necessary to directly visualize and repair the perforation, particularly in emergency situations where prompt intervention is required to prevent complications such as sepsis or hemorrhagic shock.
Deep Vein Thrombosis

4. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) or Blood Clots:

Since we have discovered that blood clots are a common injury with these devices, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) has also become a causal affect with Bard PowerPort leads. It is a critical health concern characterized by the development of blood clots within the deep veins, commonly occurring in the legs. 

This condition poses serious risks, including severe pain, swelling, and, in severe instances, life-threatening complications such as pulmonary embolism. The formation of clots obstructs normal blood flow, causing discomfort and potentially damaging the affected veins. [4]

Prompt diagnosis and intervention are paramount in managing DVT and preventing associated complications. Healthcare professionals employ diagnostic tools such as ultrasound imaging to confirm the presence of blood clots. Treatment typically involves anticoagulant medications to prevent the extension of existing clots and the formation of new ones. [4]

Additionally, compression stockings and lifestyle modifications may be recommended to support blood circulation and reduce the risk of recurrence. Awareness of risk factors, early recognition of symptoms, and adherence to preventive measures are essential for individuals at risk of DVT. [4]

Proactive measures, including maintaining physical activity and consulting healthcare providers for personalized risk assessments, contribute to effective DVT management and reduce the likelihood of severe complications. [4] So, if a claimant developed complications related to a defective port catheter, medical professionals may have encouraged maintaining regular movement and exercise. 

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and blood clots can affect Bard PowerPort leads across various demographics, but certain groups may be at higher risk. 

DVT commonly occurs in adults aged 40 and older, with the risk increasing with age. However, it can also occur in younger individuals, particularly those with risk factors such as obesity, sedentary lifestyle, or a family history of blood clotting disorders. 

While DVT can occur in both genders, females may have a slightly higher risk, particularly during pregnancy or while taking hormonal contraceptives. 

Additionally, certain racial and ethnic groups, such as African Americans, may have a higher predisposition to DVT, although this can vary depending on genetic and environmental factors.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing DVT and blood clots typically involves a combination of clinical assessment, medical history review, and diagnostic tests. These may include:

  • Physical Examination: A healthcare provider may conduct a physical examination to assess for signs and symptoms of DVT, such as swelling, warmth, tenderness, and discoloration of the affected limb. They may also evaluate for risk factors such as obesity, recent surgery, immobility, or a history of cancer.
  • D-dimer Test: A blood test known as the D-dimer test measures the levels of D-dimer, a substance produced when a blood clot breaks down. Elevated D-dimer levels may indicate the presence of a blood clot, although this test is not specific to DVT and can be elevated in other conditions.
  • Duplex Ultrasound: Duplex ultrasound imaging is a non-invasive test that uses sound waves to visualize blood flow in the veins and detect the presence of a blood clot. It is commonly used as the initial diagnostic test for DVT due to its accuracy and safety.
  • Venography: In some cases, venography may be performed to confirm the diagnosis of DVT. This invasive procedure involves injecting a contrast dye into the veins and taking X-ray images to visualize the blood flow and identify any blockages caused by blood clots.
  • CT or MRI Venography: Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) venography may be used in certain situations, particularly when ultrasound findings are inconclusive or when evaluating for DVT in unusual locations, such as the pelvis or abdomen.
  • Clinical History and Risk Assessment: A thorough clinical history, including information on recent surgeries, prolonged immobilization, use of hormonal medications, or previous episodes of DVT, is essential for guiding the diagnostic approach and assessing the risk of complications such as pulmonary embolism. Additionally, risk assessment tools such as the Wells score may be utilized to estimate the likelihood of DVT based on clinical criteria.
Catheter Embolization

5. Catheter Embolization:

Catheter embolization was listed as a qualifying criteria when we initiated our mass tort marketing and intake campaign for Bard PowerPort leads. However, we were later advised that this injury likely would not be viable and more likely give rise to professional negligence or medical malpractice. Notably, our mass tort intake specialists did not come across this injury during our initial mass tort marketing and intake campaign. 

Catheter embolization refers to the unintended detachment or breakage of a catheter during medical procedures, where the dislodged fragment then travels through the bloodstream. 

This occurrence can give rise to serious complications, including blockages that may result in organ damage and stroke. The detached catheter fragment can obstruct blood vessels, impeding normal blood flow and causing tissue damage in various organs. [2]

If the embolized catheter travels to the brain, it can lead to a stroke by blocking blood vessels supplying the brain with oxygen and nutrients. To mitigate the risks associated with catheter embolization, medical professionals take precautions during catheter-based procedures, ensuring secure placement and monitoring for any signs of catheter breakage or displacement. [2]

Immediate intervention is crucial if catheter embolization is suspected, aiming to retrieve or address the dislodged fragment to prevent potentially life-threatening complications. [2]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Embolization of catheter can occur across various demographics. However, certain factors may increase the risk of this complication. 

Patients submitting Bard PowerPort leads who are undergoing invasive procedures involving catheterization, such as central venous catheter placement or cardiac catheterization, are at higher risk. Elderly patients, individuals with coagulopathies, and those with underlying vascular conditions may also have an increased susceptibility to catheter embolization. 

While the complication can affect individuals of any age, it may be more prevalent in older adults due to the higher incidence of catheterization procedures in this population.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing embolization of catheter typically involves a combination of clinical assessment, imaging studies, and procedural evaluation. Diagnostic approaches may include:

  • Clinical Assessment: A thorough physical examination is essential to identify signs and symptoms suggestive of catheter embolization, such as sudden onset of chest pain, dyspnea, hemodynamic instability, or neurological deficits depending on the site of embolization. A detailed medical history, including information on recent catheterization procedures, is crucial.
  • Imaging Studies: Imaging modalities such as chest X-ray, echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be employed to visualize the location and extent of catheter embolization. These imaging studies can help identify the presence of the embolized catheter fragment, assess its impact on adjacent structures, and guide treatment decisions.
  • Ultrasound: In cases of peripheral catheter embolization, vascular ultrasound may be used to localize the embolized catheter fragment and evaluate its effect on blood flow in the affected vessel.
  • Venography: If suspicion of catheter embolization involves central venous catheters, venography may be performed to visualize the venous system and identify the location of the embolized catheter fragment.
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE): TEE is a valuable tool for assessing intracardiac catheter embolization, allowing direct visualization of the heart chambers and detection of embolized catheter fragments within the cardiac structures.
  • Angiography: In cases where vascular obstruction or compromise is suspected, angiography may be utilized to evaluate the vascular anatomy, identify the site of catheter embolization, and assess the extent of vascular damage.
  • Surgical Exploration or Interventional Procedures: In some instances, surgical exploration or interventional procedures such as catheter retrieval or thrombectomy may be necessary to remove the embolized catheter fragment and restore vascular patency. Prompt intervention is crucial to prevent further complications such as tissue ischemia, infarction, or systemic embolization.
pulmonary embolism

6. Pulmonary Embolism:

Pulmonary embolisms are an outcome from blood clots, so as expected our mass tort intake call center has encountered this injury when contacting Bard PowerPort leads. 

Pulmonary embolisms are a critical medical condition that occurs when a blood clot, typically originating in the deep veins of the legs (Deep Vein Thrombosis or DVT), travels to the lungs. 

This migration of the clot can lead to severe respiratory distress and, in some cases, result in life-threatening consequences. As the blood clot lodges in the pulmonary arteries, it obstructs blood flow to the lungs, compromising the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. [5]

Common symptoms of pulmonary embolism include sudden shortness of breath, chest pain, rapid heart rate, and coughing, often accompanied by bloody or discolored sputum. [5]

The severity of pulmonary embolism can vary, ranging from mild to severe, with critical cases potentially causing cardiac arrest or significant damage to the lungs. [5]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Pulmonary embolism (PE) can affect Bard PowerPort leads of various demographics, but certain populations are at higher risk. 

Age is a significant factor, with the incidence of PE increasing with age, particularly in individuals over 60 years old. 

Additionally, certain medical conditions and lifestyle factors can predispose individuals to PE. For example, individuals with a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), prolonged immobility, surgery, obesity, cancer, or a hypercoagulable state are at increased risk. 

Gender can also play a role, with PE being slightly more common in women, particularly during pregnancy and the postpartum period. 

However, overall, PE can affect people of all ages, genders, and racial or ethnic backgrounds.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing pulmonary embolism typically involves a combination of clinical assessment, imaging studies, and laboratory tests. Diagnostic approaches may include:

  • Clinical Assessment: A thorough clinical evaluation is essential to identify signs and symptoms suggestive of PE, such as sudden onset dyspnea, chest pain (often pleuritic), tachypnea, tachycardia, hemoptysis, and signs of deep vein thrombosis (e.g., leg swelling, erythema, tenderness). A detailed medical history, including risk factors for thromboembolism, recent surgeries, immobilization, or travel history, is crucial.
  • D-Dimer Assay: A D-dimer blood test may be used as an initial screening tool for patients suspected of having PE. Elevated levels of D-dimer can indicate the presence of thrombus formation and may prompt further diagnostic evaluation.
  • Imaging Studies: Imaging modalities such as computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scan, or, less commonly, pulmonary angiography may be employed to confirm the diagnosis of PE and assess its severity. CTPA is considered the gold standard imaging modality for diagnosing PE, providing detailed visualization of pulmonary vasculature and detecting filling defects indicative of emboli. V/Q scan evaluates ventilation and perfusion matching in the lungs and can detect mismatched defects suggestive of PE.
  • Echocardiography: Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) may be performed to assess cardiac function and detect signs of right heart strain or dysfunction secondary to acute PE, such as right ventricular dilation, hypokinesis, or tricuspid regurgitation.
  • Electrocardiography (ECG): ECG may reveal nonspecific changes such as sinus tachycardia, S1Q3T3 pattern, or right bundle branch block, which can raise suspicion for acute PE and aid in risk stratification.
  • Laboratory Tests: Additional laboratory investigations, including complete blood count (CBC), coagulation studies (PT/INR, aPTT), and assessment of cardiac biomarkers (e.g., troponin), may be performed to evaluate for associated abnormalities and assess the risk of complications such as right heart strain or myocardial injury.
Hematoma

7. Hematoma:

Hematomas are another injury originally listed as a qualifying injury for Bard PowerPort leads. However, we were later advised that it would not qualify. 

A hematoma refers to a localized collection of blood that accumulates outside of blood vessels, typically within tissues, organs, or body cavities. 

This condition arises from the rupture of blood vessels, leading to the pooling of blood and the formation of a swelling or mass. Hematomas can occur due to trauma, injury, or certain medical procedures. [6]

The presence of a hematoma often causes swelling, pain, and discomfort in the affected area. Depending on the size and location of the hematoma, it may impede normal bodily functions and may require medical attention. [6]

Small hematomas may resolve on their own over time, but larger or more problematic ones may necessitate intervention. [6]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Hematomas can occur in Bard PowerPort leads of all demographics and age groups, but certain factors may predispose certain populations to develop them. 

Hematomas often result from trauma or injury, so individuals who are engaged in high-risk activities or occupations, such as athletes, construction workers, or those involved in motor vehicle accidents, may be more prone to experiencing hematomas. 

Additionally, older adults, especially those taking anticoagulant medications or with underlying medical conditions affecting blood clotting (such as hemophilia), may be at increased risk of developing hematomas due to fragile blood vessels and reduced tissue elasticity. 

Gender and racial predispositions are not typically associated with hematomas.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing a hematoma typically involves a combination of clinical assessment, medical history review, and diagnostic imaging studies. Diagnostic approaches may include:

  • Physical Examination: A thorough physical examination by a healthcare provider is crucial for assessing the size, location, and characteristics of the hematoma. Signs and symptoms may include localized swelling, discoloration (bruising), tenderness, and palpable mass or fluctuance.
  • Medical History: Gathering information about the onset of symptoms, preceding trauma or injury, use of anticoagulant medications, history of bleeding disorders, and any underlying medical conditions is essential for understanding the etiology and risk factors associated with the hematoma.
  • Imaging Studies: Depending on the suspected location and extent of the hematoma, various imaging modalities may be utilized for diagnostic purposes. These may include ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or X-ray. Imaging studies help visualize the hematoma, assess its size and depth, and evaluate for any associated injuries or complications, such as fractures or internal organ damage.
  • Ultrasound: Ultrasound is often the initial imaging modality of choice for evaluating superficial hematomas, as it provides real-time visualization and can differentiate between fluid collections, solid masses, and vascular structures. It is particularly useful for assessing hematomas in soft tissue regions, muscles, and joints.
  • CT Scan or MRI: CT scan and MRI are more sensitive imaging modalities for detecting and characterizing hematomas, especially those located deep within the body or involving complex anatomical structures. These imaging studies provide detailed cross-sectional images and help determine the extent of tissue involvement, identify any associated injuries, and guide treatment planning.
  • Laboratory Tests: In some cases, laboratory investigations such as complete blood count (CBC), coagulation studies (PT/INR, aPTT), and assessment of clotting factors may be ordered to evaluate the patient’s overall coagulation status and rule out underlying bleeding disorders or systemic abnormalities contributing to the hematoma formation.

8. Hemorrhaging or Bleeding:

Hemorrhaging or internal bleeding may be a viable injury for Bard PowerPort leads. Notably, we were advised that this injury would only qualify if the device – or migrated fragments from the device – were the cause.

Hemorrhaging, or uncontrolled bleeding, poses a significant and potentially life-threatening medical emergency.

Whether occurring internally or externally, excessive blood loss can lead to severe complications and requires immediate medical intervention. External bleeding is visible and can result from wounds, injuries, or surgical procedures. Applying direct pressure to the wound, elevating the affected limb, and using bandages or dressings can help control external bleeding temporarily. [2]

However, seeking prompt medical attention is crucial to assess the severity of the bleeding and provide appropriate care. Internal bleeding, often unseen, can occur due to trauma, organ damage, or certain medical conditions. [2]

Symptoms may include weakness, dizziness, abdominal pain, or swelling. Internal bleeding can lead to shock and requires urgent medical assessment. [2]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Hemorrhaging or bleeding can occur in individuals across all demographics and age groups, and its prevalence may vary depending on various factors such as underlying health conditions, medication use, trauma, surgical procedures, and lifestyle factors.

While hemorrhaging can affect anyone, certain populations may be at higher risk. For example, older adults may be more prone to bleeding due to age-related changes in blood vessel integrity, increased prevalence of comorbidities, and polypharmacy.

Individuals with coagulopathies, such as hemophilia or von Willebrand disease, are also at increased risk of experiencing bleeding episodes. Additionally, patients undergoing invasive medical procedures, surgery, or those receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy have a heightened risk of hemorrhage.

There isn’t a specific gender or racial predilection for bleeding episodes.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing hemorrhaging or bleeding involves a comprehensive clinical evaluation, assessment of medical history, and diagnostic tests aimed at identifying the underlying cause and severity of the bleeding episode. Diagnostic approaches for Bard PowerPort leads may include:

  • Physical Examination: A thorough physical examination is crucial for assessing the extent and characteristics of bleeding. Vital signs, such as blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate, are monitored for signs of hemodynamic instability. Examination of the skin, mucous membranes, and presence of bruising, petechiae, or other external signs of bleeding is performed.
  • Medical History: Gathering information about the onset of bleeding, associated symptoms, recent trauma or surgery, medication history (including anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy), family history of bleeding disorders, and any underlying medical conditions is essential for determining the cause and risk factors for hemorrhage.
  • Laboratory Tests: Laboratory investigations play a crucial role in assessing the patient’s coagulation profile, identifying any abnormalities in platelet count, clotting factors, or fibrinogen levels. Common tests include complete blood count (CBC), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), international normalized ratio (INR), platelet count, and fibrinogen assay. Additional tests, such as assessment of von Willebrand factor activity or specific coagulation factor assays, may be performed based on clinical suspicion.
  • Imaging Studies: Depending on the suspected site and cause of bleeding, various imaging modalities may be utilized to localize and characterize the source of hemorrhage. These may include ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography, or endoscopy. Imaging studies help identify vascular abnormalities, visceral organ injuries, gastrointestinal bleeding sources, or intracranial hemorrhage.
  • Hemodynamic Monitoring: In cases of severe hemorrhage or hemodynamic instability, continuous monitoring of vital signs, central venous pressure (CVP), and cardiac output may be necessary to guide resuscitation efforts and assess response to treatment. Hemodynamic parameters provide valuable information about tissue perfusion and oxygenation status in critically ill patients.

9. Necrosis (Dead Tissue) around the Port Site:

Our mass tort marketing and intake experience with this Bard PowerPort leads has encountered necrosis around the port site when related to infection. In one case, a claimant’s infection ate away at tissue around his shoulder. Medical staff removed the tissue and infection like spoon scooping ice cream, leaving the patient with 50% use of his shoulder and arm, as well as continued pain. 

Notably, we were also informed that necrosis due to infection could be good cases. 

Necrosis, or the death of tissue, around a port site is a serious medical concern that can lead to various complications, necessitating prompt medical intervention. 

Ports are devices implanted under the skin to facilitate intravenous access to medications or other treatments. When necrosis occurs around the port site, it can result from factors such as poor blood supply, infection, or other underlying medical conditions. [1]

The dead tissue creates an environment conducive to bacterial growth, increasing the risk of infections. If left untreated, the infection can spread, potentially leading to systemic issues and further tissue damage. [1]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Necrosis, or the death of tissue, around a port site can occur in Bard PowerPort leads undergoing various medical procedures that involve the placement of a port or catheter, such as central venous catheterization or implantable port placement. 

While necrosis can potentially affect individuals of any demographic, certain factors may increase the risk. For instance, individuals with compromised circulation, such as those with peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or a history of smoking, may be more susceptible to tissue ischemia and necrosis. 

Additionally, factors such as improper placement of the port, inadequate wound care, infection, or mechanical trauma to the surrounding tissues during the procedure can contribute to tissue damage and necrosis. 

Age, gender, and racial predispositions are not typically associated with necrosis around the port site.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing necrosis around a port site involves clinical assessment, examination of the affected area, and may require additional diagnostic tests to evaluate the extent of tissue damage and identify contributing factors. Diagnostic approaches for Bard PowerPort leads may include:

  • Physical Examination: A thorough physical examination of the port site and surrounding tissues is essential for assessing the extent of tissue necrosis, evaluating wound healing, and identifying signs of infection or other complications. Signs of necrosis may include discoloration (e.g., purplish or blackened skin), loss of sensation, pain, swelling, and delayed wound healing.
  • Medical History Review: Gathering information about the patient’s medical history, including any underlying health conditions (e.g., diabetes, peripheral vascular disease), history of prior surgeries or interventions involving the port, recent trauma or injury to the port site, and adherence to wound care instructions, can provide insights into potential risk factors for tissue necrosis.
  • Imaging Studies: In cases where the extent of tissue necrosis or involvement of deeper structures needs to be assessed, imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be employed. These imaging studies can help visualize the extent of tissue damage, assess for the presence of underlying infection or abscess formation, and guide treatment planning.
  • Wound Culture: If there are signs of infection or concern for underlying sepsis contributing to tissue necrosis, a wound culture may be obtained to identify the causative pathogens and guide antimicrobial therapy.
  • Biopsy: In cases where the diagnosis is unclear or if there is suspicion of underlying malignancy or atypical tissue changes contributing to necrosis, a biopsy of the affected tissue may be performed. Histopathological examination of the biopsy sample can provide valuable information about the nature of tissue damage and aid in the diagnosis of underlying pathology.
  • Vascular Studies: In patients with suspected compromised circulation contributing to tissue necrosis, vascular studies such as Doppler ultrasound or angiography may be performed to evaluate blood flow and vascular integrity in the affected area. Identification of vascular insufficiency or occlusive disease may prompt interventions to improve perfusion and tissue viability.

10. Device-Related Organ Damage:

Device-related organ damage, particularly involving a Totally Implantable Venous Access Device (TIVAD), can have serious implications for the surrounding organs and overall health for people submitting Bard PowerPort leads. 

TIVADs are devices implanted under the skin to provide a stable and long-term access point for medical treatments such as chemotherapy or intravenous medications. Malfunctions or damage to the TIVAD can occur due to various reasons, including mechanical issues, infection, or displacement. When the device compromises surrounding organs, it can lead to harm and necessitate urgent medical assessment and intervention. [3]

Organ damage may result from the penetration of the device into adjacent structures or from leakage of fluids or medications. This damage can cause pain, inflammation, and potential impairment of organ function. [3]

Prompt medical attention is crucial to assess the extent of the damage, identify the underlying cause, and initiate appropriate interventions. [3]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Device-related organ damage can occur in individuals of various demographics of Bard PowerPort leads, particularly those undergoing medical interventions or procedures involving the placement or use of medical devices. 

While the incidence and prevalence of device-related organ damage may vary depending on factors such as the type of device, patient population, and procedural techniques, certain groups may be at increased risk. 

For example, older adults, individuals with multiple comorbidities, compromised immune function, or impaired tissue healing, may be more susceptible to device-related complications. Additionally, patients with pre-existing organ dysfunction or vascular disease may have a heightened risk of device-related organ damage. 

Gender and racial predispositions are not typically associated with device-related complications, although disparities in healthcare access and quality may influence outcomes in certain populations.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing device-related organ damage involves a combination of clinical assessment, imaging studies, laboratory tests, and procedural evaluation. Diagnostic approaches may include:

  • Clinical Evaluation: A thorough clinical assessment by healthcare providers is essential for identifying signs and symptoms suggestive of device-related organ damage. Patients may present with localized pain, swelling, tenderness, changes in organ function, or systemic signs of infection (e.g., fever, leukocytosis) depending on the affected organ and the nature of the device-related complication.
  • Imaging Studies: Imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or X-ray may be employed to visualize the affected organ and assess for the presence of device-related complications such as perforation, obstruction, or tissue injury. These imaging studies can provide detailed anatomical information, detect structural abnormalities, and guide treatment planning.
  • Laboratory Tests: Laboratory investigations, including complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistry tests, coagulation studies, and assessment of inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate), may be performed to evaluate for signs of infection, inflammation, or organ dysfunction associated with device-related complications.
  • Procedural Evaluation: In cases where device-related organ damage occurs in the context of a recent medical procedure or intervention, procedural evaluation may be necessary to assess device placement, integrity, and function. This may involve review of procedural records, imaging studies obtained during the procedure (e.g., fluoroscopy, endoscopy), and consultation with the procedural team to identify potential causes of organ damage and determine appropriate management strategies.
  • Histopathological Examination: If tissue biopsy or explantation of the device is performed, histopathological examination of the tissue sample can provide valuable insights into the nature and extent of tissue injury, presence of foreign body reaction, and inflammatory response associated with device-related complications. Histological findings can help guide treatment decisions and inform risk mitigation strategies for future device use.

11. Cardiac/Pericardial Tamponade:

Our mass tort intake call center has come across Bard PowerPort leads with cardiac tamponade cases, which are quite serious. 

Cardiac or pericardial tamponade is a critical medical condition characterized by the compression of the heart or pericardium, the sac surrounding the heart, due to the accumulation of fluid.  This fluid buildup, often resulting from trauma, infection, or other medical conditions, creates pressure on the heart, impeding its ability to pump blood effectively. The increased pressure within the pericardial sac restricts the heart’s chambers, limiting their ability to fill and contract properly. As a consequence, cardiac output is compromised, leading to a potentially life-threatening situation. [6]

Symptoms of cardiac tamponade include shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, chest pain, and low blood pressure. Urgent medical intervention is paramount in the management of cardiac tamponade. Physicians may perform emergency procedures, such as pericardiocentesis, which involves draining the excess fluid from the pericardial sac using a needle or catheter. [6]

In severe cases, surgical intervention may be necessary for patients submitting Bard PowerPort leads to relieve the pressure and address the underlying cause. [6]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Cardiac or pericardial tamponade can occur in individuals of all demographics, although certain factors may increase the risk. 

The condition is most commonly seen in adults, particularly those with underlying cardiovascular disease or recent cardiac procedures. However, it can also affect children, especially in the context of congenital heart defects or trauma. 

Individuals with conditions predisposing them to pericardial effusion, such as malignancies, infections (e.g., tuberculosis, viral pericarditis), autoimmune diseases (e.g., lupus), or renal failure, are also at increased risk. 

While pericardial tamponade can affect individuals of any gender or race, disparities in healthcare access and quality may influence outcomes in certain populations.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing cardiac or pericardial tamponade requires prompt recognition of clinical signs and symptoms, along with confirmatory diagnostic tests. Diagnostic approaches may include:

  • Clinical Evaluation: A thorough clinical assessment is essential for identifying signs and symptoms suggestive of cardiac or pericardial tamponade. Classic findings may include Beck’s triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, muffled heart sounds), pulsus paradoxus (an exaggerated decrease in systolic blood pressure during inspiration), dyspnea, tachycardia, and altered mental status. Physical examination may reveal jugular venous distention, distant heart sounds, and decreased peripheral perfusion.
  • Echocardiography: Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the primary imaging modality for diagnosing pericardial tamponade. Echocardiography allows direct visualization of pericardial effusion, assessment of chamber collapse during the cardiac cycle, and measurement of hemodynamic parameters such as right atrial and ventricular collapse. TEE is particularly useful for visualizing posterior cardiac structures and guiding pericardiocentesis in unstable patients.
  • Electrocardiography (ECG): ECG may reveal nonspecific changes such as electrical alternans (beat-to-beat variation in QRS amplitude), sinus tachycardia, low-voltage QRS complexes, or electrical axis deviation. While ECG findings are not specific to tamponade, they can raise suspicion and prompt further evaluation.
  • Chest X-ray: Chest X-ray may demonstrate an enlarged cardiac silhouette due to pericardial effusion, although findings may be nonspecific. Signs of pulmonary congestion or pleural effusion may also be present.
  • Hemodynamic Monitoring: Continuous hemodynamic monitoring, including blood pressure measurement, central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring, and assessment of cardiac output, may be performed to evaluate the severity of hemodynamic compromise and guide resuscitative efforts.
  • Laboratory Tests: Laboratory investigations, including complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistry tests, coagulation studies, and cardiac biomarkers (e.g., troponin), may be obtained to assess for associated conditions (e.g., myocardial infarction, coagulopathy) and guide treatment.
Heart Arrythmia

12. Cardiac Arrhythmia:

Although cardiac arrhythmia originally was considered a qualifying injury, we were later informed that this would not be qualified as a primary injury for Bard PowerPort leads. 

Cardiac arrhythmia refers to irregular heart rhythms that can manifest as abnormalities in the rate, rhythm, or sequence of heartbeats. 

This condition can lead to various symptoms, ranging from palpitations and dizziness to more severe cardiac events, necessitating prompt medical attention. The heart’s normal electrical conduction system may be disrupted, causing the heart to beat too fast (tachycardia), too slow (bradycardia), or irregularly. [6]

Arrhythmias can result from factors such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, or aging. In some cases, they may occur without an identifiable cause. Palpitations, the sensation of rapid or irregular heartbeats, are a common symptom of arrhythmias. Individuals may also experience dizziness, fainting (syncope), chest discomfort, or shortness of breath. [6]

Severe arrhythmias can contribute to more serious complications, including heart failure or stroke. [6]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Cardiac arrhythmias can affect individuals submitting Bard PowerPort leads of all ages, genders, and races, but certain factors may predispose certain populations to develop them. 

While arrhythmias can occur in individuals without underlying heart disease, they are more prevalent in individuals with pre-existing cardiac conditions such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, congenital heart defects, or cardiomyopathies. 

Age is also a significant risk factor, with the incidence of arrhythmias increasing with advancing age due to age-related changes in the heart’s electrical conduction system. 

Certain lifestyle factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, obesity, and high levels of stress can also contribute to the development of arrhythmias. 

Additionally, genetic predisposition and family history may play a role in some cases.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Diagnosing cardiac arrhythmias involves a combination of clinical assessment, electrocardiographic evaluation, and sometimes additional diagnostic tests. Diagnostic approaches may include:

  • Electrocardiography (ECG or EKG): A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is often the initial diagnostic test performed to evaluate for arrhythmias. ECG findings can help identify various types of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular tachycardia, and bradyarrhythmias. Ambulatory monitoring devices, such as Holter monitors or event monitors, may be used for longer-term monitoring to capture intermittent arrhythmias.
  • Echocardiography: Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) may be performed to assess cardiac structure and function and evaluate for underlying structural heart disease or myocardial dysfunction that may predispose to arrhythmias. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) may be used in certain cases to provide more detailed imaging of cardiac structures.
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS): Electrophysiological studies involve the insertion of catheters into the heart to map the electrical conduction system and provoke arrhythmias under controlled conditions. EPS is particularly useful for diagnosing and characterizing complex arrhythmias, identifying the site of origin, and guiding therapeutic interventions such as catheter ablation.
  • Ambulatory Monitoring: Ambulatory monitoring devices, such as Holter monitors, event monitors, or implantable loop recorders, may be used for prolonged monitoring of cardiac rhythm in patients with suspected or intermittent arrhythmias. These devices allow for continuous recording of ECG signals over an extended period to capture arrhythmic events that may not be detected during a standard ECG.
  • Laboratory Tests: Laboratory investigations, including blood tests to assess electrolyte levels (e.g., potassium, magnesium), thyroid function tests, cardiac biomarkers (e.g., troponin), and other metabolic parameters, may be performed to evaluate for underlying metabolic or systemic conditions that may contribute to arrhythmias or exacerbate existing arrhythmias.
  • Exercise Stress Testing: Exercise stress testing may be used to assess the heart’s response to physical exertion and unmask exercise-induced arrhythmias, particularly in individuals with suspected arrhythmias triggered by exercise or exertion.

13. Obstruction of Blood Flow:

Our mass tort intake agents have witnessed Bard PowerPort leads with obstruction of blood flow complications.

Obstruction of blood flow, resulting from blockages in blood vessels, can lead to a range of complications depending on the location and extent of the impediment. 

This condition hampers the normal circulation of blood, disrupting the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to vital organs and tissues throughout the body. In the arteries, blockages can stem from the buildup of plaque, blood clots, or other substances, leading to conditions such as coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease. [5]

The consequences may include angina, heart attacks, or impaired circulation to the extremities, resulting in pain and tissue damage. Venous obstruction, often caused by blood clots or compression of veins, can lead to conditions like deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or venous insufficiency. DVT poses the risk of clot migration to the lungs, causing a potentially life-threatening pulmonary embolism. [5]

Obstruction in smaller vessels may result in ischemia, affecting specific organs or tissues and leading to conditions like stroke or limb ischemia. Prompt medical intervention is crucial in managing blood flow obstruction. Treatment approaches vary and may involve medications, lifestyle changes, or surgical procedures to remove or bypass the blockage. [5]

Prevention strategies, such as maintaining a healthy lifestyle and managing risk factors, play a key role in reducing the likelihood of blood flow obstructions and associated complications. Regular medical check-ups help in early detection and management, optimizing overall cardiovascular and circulatory health. [5]

a. Demographics or Statistics:

Obstruction of blood flow can affect patients submitting Bard PowerPort leads of all ages, but the prevalence increases with age, particularly in older adults due to the cumulative effects of aging and associated risk factors such as atherosclerosis.

While obstruction of blood flow can occur in individuals of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, certain populations may have a higher prevalence of conditions associated with vascular occlusion. For instance, African Americans have a higher incidence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) compared to other racial groups.

Individuals with underlying health conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, coagulopathies, autoimmune diseases, vasculitis, and genetic disorders affecting blood vessels are at increased risk of developing vascular occlusion.

Both males and females can be affected by obstruction of blood flow, although certain conditions leading to vascular occlusion may have gender-specific risk factors. For example, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is more common in females during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

b. Diagnosis and Tests:

Early diagnosis of obstruction of blood flow is essential for preventing complications such as tissue ischemia, necrosis, and organ dysfunction.

  • Clinical Assessment: A thorough clinical evaluation is essential for assessing symptoms suggestive of vascular occlusion, such as pain, pallor, pulselessness, paresthesia, and paralysis (the “5 Ps”). Physical examination may also reveal signs of tissue ischemia or necrosis.
  • Imaging Studies: Various imaging modalities may be used to diagnose obstruction of blood flow and assess its severity and location. These may include Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and conventional angiography.
  • Blood Tests: Laboratory tests such as complete blood count (CBC), coagulation studies, lipid profile, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate) may be performed to assess for underlying conditions contributing to vascular occlusion or inflammation.
  • Vascular Studies: Functional studies such as ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement, pulse volume recordings (PVR), and arterial duplex ultrasound may be used to assess blood flow, arterial pressure, and vascular integrity in affected limbs.
  • Endovascular Procedures: In cases where imaging studies identify significant vascular occlusion, invasive procedures such as catheter-based angiography or endovascular interventions (e.g., angioplasty, stenting) may be performed for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
  • Tissue Biopsy: In certain cases, tissue biopsy may be necessary to confirm the underlying cause of vascular occlusion, particularly in cases of suspected vasculitis or malignancy.

Conclusion

Bard PowerPort

At this early stage of the tort, Bard PowerPort leads can be tough to generate if you’re looking for the lowest cost cases. Our mass tort marketing and intake service has made great inroads into understanding how to generate quality Bard PowerPort leads and qualify prospective claimants for this tort. 

Naturally, our service includes client verification that include driver’s licenses, selfies, and background checks contribute to eliminate fraud. Further, ensuring symptoms, tests, diagnosis, and treatment of qualifying injuries all line up is another element we rely upon to ensure high qualify intakes are generated. 

Mass tort intake call center agents play a crucial role in identifying potential patients who may have suffered injuries of patients who have submitted Bard PowerPort leads. By understanding the criteria and associated ailments, agents can effectively qualify individuals and ensure that those who meet the specified criteria are connected with legal support. This knowledge empowers agents to handle calls with sensitivity, empathy, and a deeper understanding of the medical context, ultimately aiding in the pursuit of justice for affected individuals. For more information on generating and converting quality Bard PowerPort leads, reach out to us today. 

References:

  1. Oncology Nursing Society. (2019). Central Venous Access Devices. Retrieved from https://www.ons.org/practice-resources/central-venous-access-devices
  2. American College of Radiology. (2022). Central Venous Access: Ports. Retrieved from https://www.acr.org/Clinical-Resources/Radiology-Safety/Contrast-Manual/Appendices/Appendix-B4
  3. Bard Access Systems. (2022). PowerPort® Device Information. Retrieved from https://www.bardaccess.com/products/powerport/
  4. Mayo Clinic. (2022). Deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/deep-vein-thrombosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20352557
  5. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. (2022). Pulmonary Embolism. Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/pulmonary-embolism
  6. American College of Cardiology. (2022). Hematoma. Retrieved from https://www.acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/articles/2019/12/19/13/14/hematoma
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022). Sepsis. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/index.html
  8. Weijmer, M.C., Strategies to reduce hemodialysis catheter-related complications (2007) 69.
  9. Braun et al., Mechanic and surface properties of central-venous port catheters after removal: A comparison of polyurethane and silicon rubber materials, J. Mech. Behav. Biomed. Mats. 64 (2016) 281-291.  

Recent Posts